EVALUATION IN THE PLANNING DISCOURSE: SAMPLE EVALUATION PROCEDURES EXAMPLE 1: FORMAL ‘QUALITY‘ EVALUATION

Thorbjørn Mann,  January 2020

In the following segments, a few examples procedures for evaluation by groups will be discussed, to illustrate how the various parts of the evaluation process are selectively assembled into a complete process aiming at decision (or recommendation) for decision about a proposed plan or policy; to facilitate understanding of the way the different provisions and choices related to the evaluation task that are reviewed in this study can be assembled to practical procedures for specific situations. The examples are not intended to be universal recommendations for use in all situations. They all will — arguably — call for improvement as well as adaptation to the specific project and situation at hand.

A common evaluation situation is that of a panel of evaluators comparing a number of proposed alternative plan solutions to select or recommend the ‘best’ choice for adoption. Or — if there is only one proposal, — to determine if it is ‘good enough’ for implementation. It is usually carried out by a small group of people assumed to be knowledgeable of the specific discipline (for example, architecture) and reasonably representative of the interests of the project client (which may be the public). The rationale for such efforts, besides aiming for the ‘best’ decision, is the desire for ensuring that the decision will be based on good expert knowledge, but also for transparency and legitimacy and accountability of the process — to justify the decision. The outcome will usually be a recommendation to the actual client decision-makers rather than the actual adoption or implementation decision, based on the group’s assessment of the ‘goodness’ or ‘quality’ of the proposed plan, documented in some form. (It will be referred to as a ‘Formal Quality Evaluation’ procedure.)

There are of course many possible variations of procedures for this task. The sample procedure described in the following is based on the Musso-Rittel (1) procedure for the evaluation of the ‘goodness’ or quality of buildings.

The group will begin by agreeing on the procedure itself and its various provisions: the steps to be followed (for example, whether evaluation aspects and weighting should be worked out before or after presentation of the plan or plan alternatives), general vocabulary, judgment and weighting scales, aggregation functions both for individual overall judgments and group indices, and decision rules for determining its final recommendation.

Assuming that the group has adopted the sequence of first establishing the evaluation aspects and criteria against which the plan (or plans) will be judged, the first step will be a general discussion of the aspects and sub-aspects to be considered, resulting in the construction of the ‘aspect tree’ of aspects, sub-aspects, sub-sub-aspects etc. (ref. the section on aspects and aspect trees) and criteria (the ‘objective’ measures of performance; ref. the section on evaluation criteria). The resulting tree will be displayed and become the basis for scoring worksheets.

The second step will be the assignment of aspect weights (on a scale of zero to to 1 and such that at each level of the ‘tree’, the sum of weights at that level will be 1. Panel members will develop their own individual weighting. This phase can be further refined by applying ‘Delphi Method’ steps: establishing and displaying the mean / median and extreme weighting values and then asking the authors of extremely low or high weights to share and discuss their reasoning for these judgments, and giving all members the chance to revise their weights.

Once the weighted evaluation aspect trees have been established, the next step will be the presentation of the plan proposal or competing alternatives.

Each participant will assign a first ‘overall offhand’ quality score (on the agreed-upon scale, e.g. -3 to +3) to each plan alternative.

The group’s statistics of these scores are then established and displayed. This may help to decide whether any further discussion and detailed scoring of aspects will be needed: there may be a visible consensus for a clear ‘winner’. If there are disagreements, the group decides to go through with the detailed evaluation, and the initial scores are kept for later comparison with the final results. using common worksheets or spreadsheets of the aspect tree, for panel members to fill in their weighting and quality scores. This step may involve the drawing of ‘criterion functions’ (ref. the section of evaluation criteria and criterion functions) to explain how each participant’s quality judgments depend on (objective) criteria or performance measures. These diagrams may be discussed by the panel. They should be considered each panel member’s subjective basis of judgment (or representation of the interests of factions in the population of affected parties). However, some such functions may be the mandatory official regulations (such as building regulations). The temptation to urge adoption of common (group) functions (‘for simplicity and expression of ‘common purpose’) should be resisted to avoid possible bias towards the interests of some parties at the expense of others.

Each group member will then fill in the scores for all aspects and sub-aspects etc. The results will be compiled, and the statistics compared; extreme differences in the scoring will be discussed, and members given the chance to change their assessments. This step may be repeated as needed (e.g. until there are no further changes in the judgments).

The results are calculated and the group recommendation determined according to the agreed-upon decision criterion. The ‘deliberated’ individual overall scores are compared with the members’ initial ‘offhand’ scores. The results may cause the group to revise the aspects, weights, or criteria, (e.g. upon discovering that some critical aspect has been missed), or call for changes in the plan, before determining the final recommendation or decision (again, according to the initial procedural agreements).

The steps are summarized in the following ‘flow chart’.

Evalmap15 FormalevalEvaluation example 1: Steps of a ‘Group Formal Quality Evaluation’

Questions related to this version of a formal evaluation process may include the issue of potential manipulation of weight assignments by changing the steepness of the criterion junction.
Ostensibly, the described process aims at ‘giving due consideration’ to all legitimately ‘pertinent’ aspects, while eliminating or reducing the role of ‘hidden agenda’ factors. Questions may arise whether such ‘hidden’ concerns might be hidden behind other plausible but inordinately weighted aspects. A question that may arise from discussions and argumentation about controversial aspects of a plan and the examination of how such arguments should be assessed (ref. the section on a process for Evaluation of Planning Arguments) is the role of plausibility judgments about the premises of such arguments: esp. the probability of assumption claims that a plan will actually result in a desired or undesired outcome (an aspect). Should the ‘quality’ assessment’ process include a modification of quality scores based on plausibility / probability scores, or should this concern be explicitly included in the aspect list?

The process may of course seem ‘too complicated’, and if done by ‘experts’, invite critical questions whether the experts really can overcome their own interests, bias and preconceptions to adequately consider the interests of other, less‘expert’ groups. The procedure obviously assumes a general degree of cooperativeness in the panel, which sometimes may be unrealistic. Are more adequate provisions needed for dealing with incompatible attitudes and interests?

Other questions? Concerns? Missing considerations?

–o–

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